It’s not a secret. We do monetize social discovery, and it’s great.

There have been a few articles popping up discussing Pinterest’s use of Skimlinks, so we wanted to dive in and talk about what they are doing, as it’s not a secret or sneaky or covert, but a very popular, mainstream, and valuable approach to content monetization.

First off, Pinterest’s use of Skimlinks technology is nothing new, nor is it secretive. Skimlinks has been around for almost 4 years now, we are established and relatively well-known, and a large proportion of our customers are blogs, forums and social discovery sites. Pinterest and many other social discovery sites have been working with us for a long time, and although they are fabulously popular now, we like to think we helped them get the revenues and insights that helped them grow.

Online communities need ways to generate revenue to support their operations, and the preference is always to earn this revenue without disrupting their users or detracting from their UI with flashy advertisements. Creating a beautiful, user-friendly site, as Pinterest has done, mandates a non-intrusive way to make money.

In-content monetization can play a role in supporting the development of a community, and we hope that we helped get things off the ground, especially in the early days. Our goal as innovators is to create technologies that can help support similar businesses without impacting on the cutting edge user experiences these beautifully designed sites offer.

Secondly, some of these articles raise the point that Pinterest has not been vocal to their community in disclosing that they work with Skimlinks. While we fully encourage transparency and disclosure, at the very least because it is a nice thing to do, many sites choose not to be blatant about their monetization techniques straight away. We can encourage and give best practises, and we do, but it is up to a publisher the extent to which they make public their inner workings. From a legal perspective, for what it is worth, disclosure is required only where the content creator is making endorsements that they financially profit from, like when a blogger is paid to encourage their readers to buy something, or a price comparison site encourages the purchase of a particular insurance product where they get paid for that referral. By providing a platform where people can post things they like, Pinterest isn’t endorsing particular products for the sake of financial gain, just providing a valuable forum for products to be browsed by their community. So it is understandable that they didn’t want to make a big deal of this, especially as so many other content sites also use Skimlinks and affiliate marketing technology to help fund their operations.

A quick read of some of the comments on these articles shows that the majority of people don’t see this as an issue. Comments such as;  “I think this is genius and other companies should be doing the same.”, “I personally would prefer this model to one whereby I am bombarded with ads.”, and “Pinterest users should be happy that the site can support itself without showing ads. Stores have gained an effective discovery platform. This is not duplicitous, and it hurts no one. So who cares if they disclose or not?”, show that end users welcome this form of monetization.

Thirdly, the value of our service goes beyond just its direct monetization potential. The data and analytics that we can provide about how community members are interacting with merchant and product information can be invaluable to publishers. The insights that can be gleaned by running Skimlinks have helped thousands of our publishers understand their customer base more, understand their shopping preferences, purchase behaviours, all without infringing on their privacy or interrupting their browsing experience.

Publishers can then make decisions to focus more on certain users or products or merchants, with knowledge that their community respond well to these people and products. This is how merchants benefit, aside from the fact that by helping these sites fund themselves, they are creating future sources of new customers.

It is often this early revenue from our SkimLinks and SkimWords products that can play a role in keeping publishers afloat in the early days, and this data that can help take these publishers to another level of growth and success.

Bottom line: We are thrilled by the (well earned, not overnight!) success of Pinterest, which is a phenomenal example of how social discovery and other sites can monetize without intruding on their user experience.

As a company, we’re constantly delighted to see how publishers use our technologies in new and innovative ways. The most exciting part of building our platform is seeing what other people can build on top of it – and Pinterest has taken it to a whole ‘nother level. Well done, lads.

Alicia is Skimlinks’ CEO and Co-Founder and you can find her on Twitter: @alicianavarro

Alicia Navarro

91 Comments to It’s not a secret. We do monetize social discovery, and it’s great.

Scott Jangro
February 8, 2012

Hey Alicia.

I think that it is great that Pinterest is monetizing on their links. I see nothing wrong with that. Congrats to you guys for having grabbed onto this rocketship!

I just wish that they had the foresight to disclose it *somewhere*.

I want to give them he benefit of the doubt and see this as just something they probably didn’t think of, or didn’t realize that this would cause a stir among some subset of their user base.

If there’s nothing to be ashamed of (which I don’t think there is) then why hide it? Not to make a big deal out of it, not because it’s legal or not, but just to *not* be seen as sneaky.

We as an affiliate industry get hurt when people see what we do as sneaky. There’s already stigma and suspicion tied to what we do, and this just exacerbates it.

The fact that this has made it to the New York Times blog questioning whether it should be disclosed or not, and you having to step up to defend them demonstrates this.

That NYT press should be celebrating what they’re doing like some of the commenters that you point out are. But instead it is tainted with ethical questions.

Since you guys are a particularly high profile member of that industry, with a technology that is bringing us mainstream perhaps more than ever, I believe that it’s on you to help improve that perception.

And how the Pinterest founders respond will speak volumes. I hope they don’t blow it.

BTW, Cloudflare does a similar thing with Viglinks. They hid this behind an outbound click tracking service that also turned links into affiliate links that Cloudflare benefitted from. I say “hid” because it was turned on without telling me about it, and I had to sleuth it out. Was that illegal? Certainly not, but it felt pretty crappy to me.

Tricia Meyer
February 8, 2012

I just wrote something along the very same lines and thought that I was going to be in the minority!!

http://www.tricia.me/2012/02/08/pinterest-links/

Emilio Silvas
February 8, 2012

I get that affiliate linking is part of the monetization process. I simply think Pinterest, and Skimlinks because of their affiliation, is missing the point. Editing user data is the problem. Why should I trust Pinterest when they have proven that editing my content is fair game? I develop social media applications and one thing I would not do is edit user content. If the user can not trust you to leave their content alone, especially if it’s not infringing/hate speech or otherwise illegal, you have a big problem on your hands. Once you convince yourself of this small edit, the next one becomes easier.

http://laterboy.com/post/17261970977/anytime-a-user-pins-an-item-that-has-a

[...] story for both startups making money early and for the affiliate marketing industry. Source: blog.skimlinks.com → | ∞ [...]

Alicia
February 8, 2012

Awesome post, Tricia! You nailed it – there are many arguments, and sure, we could all do things differently or better, but I don’t think this is an unusual or unfair practice, and the language used in some headlines feel very sensationalist.

Alicia
February 8, 2012

You raise great points as always, Scott, thank you.
We do encourage disclosure, so I agree that it is preferable, but we cannot force how someone does business, and what they are doing isn’t illegal, nor at all unusual, so it feels they are getting a lot of attention just because they are at a critical mass.
I also do agree that it is our responsibility at Skimlinks to encourage optimal behaviour with our type of monetization… and we do, very actively. But we also encourage *appropriate* disclosure for your community, and how they interpret that is up to them. The guys at Pinterest are no doubt primarily focused on building a great product and user experience.

Savanah Fahrney-Day
February 8, 2012

My only issue is that it is an FTC violation for them not to have a CLEAR disclosure…Its the lack of disclosure that makes it “sneaky”, not to mention illegal in this case.

Ariel
February 8, 2012

Maybe I’m too immersed in monetized content to have an unbiased perspective, but the response to Pinterest using affiliate links just feels ludicrous to me — of COURSE they use affiliate links! Why shouldn’t they? It costs the users nothing, is a totally seamless experience, and only profits when users purchase something. I’ve assumed this would be Pinterest’s primary business model — they’ve essentially created the most amazing catalog ever; why shouldn’t they make a cut when people make purchases?

Sean Locke
February 8, 2012

Alicia, how do you feel about the fact that the majority of Pinterest’s content is infringing upon the works of others, as Pinterest members go about the web “pinning” copyrighted works (ie., copying the physical full size file to their servers) and are then profiting from this copyright infringement? Without this huge trove of infringed upon material, Pinterest would be nothing more than a photo sharing site. Can you justify them (and yourself) profiting from this methodology without compensation (or permission) from the content creators?

[...] Empire Skimlinks.com Search Engine [...]

Alicia
February 8, 2012

Savannah – it isn’t 100% clear in FTC guidelines that disclosure is required in this type of situation. It is required where the content creation process results in an active *endorsement* of a product that the content creator is compensated for. In this instance, the content creator is not the platform is not the monetization party – so the content creation process is not resulting in endorsements that are influenced by its monetization. So it isn’t illegal. It may be considered ‘sneaky’, but millions of sites around the world monetize through affiliate marketing and almost all of them do not disclose as well as they could. This has only become a discussed topic because Pinterest are so popular, not because they are doing anything different or worse than most other publishers.

That being said, we actively encourage disclosure – this isn’t Pinterest being sneaky, this is no doubt them being very very busy dealing with success :)

Alicia
February 8, 2012

Interesting question, Sean, and one that I fear I am not knowledgeable enough to answer. We are a platform – we monetize links and words. We don’t get involved in anything else. How do I feel about it? I feel that Pinterest is driving awareness and traffic to a lot of sites, and that most of them may be pleased for this exposure and attention. I could be wrong – that is just my immediate view on reading your comment.

[...] company is Skimlinks, and in a blog post today, co-founder Alicia Navarro calls what Pinterest is doing “a very popular, mainstream, and [...]

Andrew Girdwood
February 8, 2012

I’m glad Skimlinks is present on Pinterest – although I can’t see your usual code signatures. Something special for Pinterest?

Here’s a question though – Skimlinks also provides a social service for your affiliates, a URL shortening service that lets us Tweet, Facebook or Pin our enhanced URLs.

If we pin one of our own Skimlinks style shortened URLs into Pinterest who gets the commission?

[...] Update: Skimlinks, the company powering the link injection, informally responds via its blog, distancing itself every so slightly from Pinterest's non-disclosure : Pinterests [...]

Ariel
February 8, 2012

Sean, I’m sure Pinterest’s lawyers have answers to those questions, but I’ll answer for myself: As a publisher, I will say that Pinterest is now THE top referrer to my site, because people pin our photos there. Does it bother me that Pinterest hosts my images on their servers? Nope, because they send me roughly 30,000 visitors a month. That strikes me as a fair trade.

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

Sean Locke
February 8, 2012

Well, that falls under the “I’m ok with it because it benefits me”. In fact, you may even be granting “pinners” the right to “pin” somewhere in the TOS of your site, which would be your right. What about the rest of the world that isn’t happy that their work is being randomly stolen and copied without their knowledge to another site for their commercial gain? Just because you accept it doesn’t mean it’s right for them to encourage the rest of the world to do it to others.

BTW, their lawyer said “If you want your images removed for copyright reasons, you can send us a notice of removal following the procedure on our Copyright page.” which is only a compliance with DMCA guidelines, and not really acknowledgement of the ongoing issue.

Jim Banks
February 9, 2012

I’m no lawyer, and to make matters worse I am British, so the understanding of the intricacies of the FTC requirements I’ll leave down to qualified professionals.

However, the new disclosure requirements were introduced to replace some really archaic regulations that pre-dated Al Gore’s invention. There will always be different interpretations and I am in agreement with Alicia that there will be some ambiguity.

I take my hat off to entrepreneurial flair. Pinterest and Skimlinks have combined perfectly in providing the platform for User Generated content to benefit all parties, the user, the users friends, the provider (Pinterest) and the money maker (Skimlinks).

If it became spammy, and legitimate affiliate links are being switched out, then that might be a different story, I’ve not taken the time to visit Pinterest (I actually use Gimmebar.com to do the same thing for my pinnable stuff), but I am sure their terms are pretty succint and anyone signing up for an account knows what to expect. The Skimlinks experience is contextual and complimentary.

Glad you took the time to write though, nice to get clarification, now everyone can move on and make some money and interact socially with their content.

UGC ftw!!

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

[...] It was later revealed, by Mike Butcher at Techcrunch, that the service Pinterest was using was one called Skimlinks. Skimlinks allows sites to monetize links throughout their site automatically by inserting these affiliate partner codes. Then Skimlinks went on the record to state that its relationship with Pinterest ‘isn’t a secret‘. [...]

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

Carleen
February 9, 2012

I think your interpretation of who an endorser is runs narrower than how the FTC might see it. By choosing to step in and add a monetization feature, Pinterest is forming a material relationship based on that piece of content. And by doing so, it adopts whatever “endorsement” might have been put there in connection with it, whether that be stating “love this you should buy it” or merely showing something compelling that might cause a person to click through. Basically, by adding the monetization, they become an endorser as well. The FTC has also recently made it clearer that affiliate linkage fall under their interpretive guides. However, the use of endorsements in user generated content and the disclosures required is not yet legally tested and the FTC is the ultimate body that gets to interpret this, so it will be interesting to watch. I imagine that all of the press will cause them sit up and take notice. Hopefully when they do so, they will provide further guidance on this area. I just hope it ultimately doesn’t harm Pinterest as I really enjoy using their platform.

[...] the affiliate linking technology to Pinterest, told me she has 20,000 customers. She (naturally) sees nothing wrong with the affiliate link [...]

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

[...] Source 1 / Source 2 / Source 3 Rédigé le : février 9th, 2012Categories: A la une, Acquisition, Affiliation, [...]

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

[...] though it was first reported at the start of the year. Pinterest uses a scheme called Skimlinks and the technology automatically assigns an affiliate link to a link if it points to a website with [...]

JP de Irrua
February 9, 2012

What about Pinterest users who use their own affiliate links when pinning stuff (that they like). It has worked fine for me, adding affiliate links to the things I pin because I like them.

I wonder if that’s widespread.

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

[...] The Skimlinks CEO has been active in commenting on the story including writing a blog post. [...]

[...] question after I read an article forwarded to me recently about how the visual bookmarking tool makes money off of users’ pins. For anyone who doesn’t know what Pinterest is, it’s a site where people [...]

Howard
February 9, 2012

Alicia-

You are not only intelligent, but equally beautiful.

Keep up the great work!

[...] question after I read an article forwarded to me recently about how the visual bookmarking tool makes money off of users’ pins. For anyone who doesn’t know what Pinterest is, it’s a site where people [...]

Alicia
February 10, 2012

Why thank you!

Alicia
February 10, 2012

We don’t touch affiliated links. And yes, it is widespread.

Don
February 10, 2012

Alicia, thank you for addressing the issue of those that do pin with their own tracking code. You say that you do not change their links. That is great news. Following along with that information, what about re-pins? If I pin something with my own tracking code, you do not touch that, but if it gets re-pinned does the tracking code stay with it or do you snatch it?

This is a great site and the potential opportunity for some to generate a buck or two for pinning to their cool boards products that they think are relevant is awesome. If you guys are just harvesting those links that are fair game, have no tracking code, and can make a buck for Pinterest and yourselves, then my friend that is all apple pie as we all win here. Kuddos if it is true, but the little guy in me says “NOT”! Hope he is wrong.

[...] Yes, platforms like Pinterest (and Pocket-Lint and WIWT) use a tool called Skimlinks to generate revenue from subtle referral links. As Skimlinks CEO Alicia Navarro so aptly explained: “It’s not a secret. We do monetize social discovery, and it’s great”. [...]

[...] question after I read an article forwarded to me recently about how the visual bookmarking tool makes money off of users’ pins. For anyone who doesn’t know what Pinterest is, it’s a site where people [...]

[...] question after I read an article forwarded to me recently about how the visual bookmarking tool makes money off of users’ pins. For anyone who doesn’t know what Pinterest is, it’s a site where people [...]

[...] question after I read an article forwarded to me recently about how the visual bookmarking tool makes money off of users’ pins. For anyone who doesn’t know what Pinterest is, it’s a site where people [...]

Alicia
February 10, 2012

Hi Don,
Skimlinks does not touch existing affiliate links, only unaffiliated ones. Thanks for your support!

[...] defended its role with Pinterest in the matter and stated that they do encourage their partners to be open and [...]

[...] question after I read an article forwarded to me recently about how the visual bookmarking tool makes money off of users’ pins. For anyone who doesn’t know what Pinterest is, it’s a site where people [...]

Don
February 11, 2012

Alicia,

Thanks for answering me and that is awesome news. I think it should be shouted louder because you re not taking away from anyone for yourselves or Pinterest in this manner. The media has this romping around as though Pinterest and Skimlinks are doing something bad. I have read several articles and they just lean towards something sneaky or underhanded. You are not stealing from anyone is probably the best way to state it. It is a fair game and that is worth something these days. Have a great day!

[...] defended its role with Pinterest in the matter and stated that they do encourage their partners to be open and [...]

[...] cruising their site and automatically inserting affiliate partner codes wherever possible. Later, Skimlinks went on the defensive, publicly stating that its business with Pinterest “is not a [...]

[...] question after I read an article forwarded to me recently about how the visual bookmarking tool makes money off of users’ pins. For anyone who doesn’t know what Pinterest is, it’s a site where people [...]

[...] “It’s not a secret. We do monetize social discovery, and it’s great.” [...]

[...] company is Skimlinks, and in a blog post today, co-founder Alicia Navarro calls what Pinterest is doing “a very popular, mainstream, and [...]

[...] it one step further, and in bid to clear their actions, Alicia Navarro, co-founder and CEO of Skimlinks refuted these claims publicly in a blog, titled, “It’s [...]

Adam Teece
February 14, 2012

I really think it is funny when people get upset about this. Many ISPs do the same thing, only worse is if you type in a website directly, when it goes through their servers, it goes through their affiliate link, so you have no choice or control at all.

[...] Alicia Navarro, co-fundadora y CEO de Skimlinks, respondió a las quejas de un puñado de bloggers que mostraron su indignación sobre la estrategia nicial de monetización del proyecto en su post “No es un secreto”: [...]

[...] Alicia Navarro, co-fundadora y CEO de Skimlinks, respondió a las quejas de un puñado de bloggers que mostraron su indignación sobre la estrategia nicial de monetización del proyecto en su post “No es un secreto”: [...]

[...] agree with Scott Jangro (please read his comment) and others who are educated in the affiliate industry. There isn’t anything wrong with what [...]

[...] this does not seem to be the case. In fact, business seems to be carrying on as usual. And why not? A representative from Skimlinks responded to the recent inquiries with a statement that essentially informs the online audience that monetization of user-generated [...]

SADFRR
February 19, 2012

123

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DiTesco
February 21, 2012

I don’t get it. Why are people so freaked out about Pinterest using SkimLinks anyway. I mean, if I understood correctly how SkinLinks work, the links remain intact and are only redirected via its server for affiliate programs. If the link from Pinterest is pointing to my blog, nothing happens, right? I think that SkimLinks concept is simply awesome and non intruding. Perhaps, the only “missing” part of the whole hulabalooh is that “Pinterest” should probably have disclosed it “somewhere”. It is a viable business model and an ethical business approach. Oh well..

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

[...] also responded to the controversy stating “Pinterest’s use of Skimlinks technology is nothing new, nor is [...]

[...] Skimlinks CEO Alicia Navarro defends Pinterest, pointing out that disclosure is not legally required in this case, it is only necessary when the content creator makes endorsements that they profit from. [...]

[...] For more information on affiliated networks and how Pinterest is using the service, visit Navarro’s latest blog post on Skimlinks here. [...]

[...] analytically when bringing users the kind of content they want. Since the scandal, Pinterest has stopped using Skimlinks’ affiliate services. The businesses still remain friendly; in an interview on [...]

[...] As Skimlinks CEO Alicia Navarro so aptly explained: “It’s not a secret. We do monetize social discovery, and it’s great”. [...]

[...] responded, unfazed and unapologetic. “It’s not a secret,” she blogged. “We do monetise social discovery, and it’s great. Pinterest and many other [...]

[...] responded, unfazed and unapologetic. “It’s not a secret,” she blogged. “We do monetise social discovery, and it’s great. Pinterest and many other [...]

[...] There have been a few articles popping up discussing Pinterest’s use of Skimlinks, so we wanted to dive in and talk about what they are doing, as it’s not a secret or sneaky or covert , but a very popular, mainstream, and valuable approach to content monetization. It’s not a secret. We do monetize social discovery, and it’s great. | Blog | skimlinks.com [...]

[...] the detail-oriented, aesthete-loving user for curating value that generates a steady following and steady affiliate revenue for the site owners. But when I played around on Lockerz, which has been designed for the high school crowd, I feel [...]

R Davis
April 27, 2012

In my mind, without question any link that generates income to the site for clicking on it should be disclosed up front. This kind of undisclosed situation degrades the internet shopping experience because it lessens the free choice of the consumers. Consumers definitely want to know if they are being fed a diet consisting of paid links, because they are seeking uninfluenced choices and do not want to be hoodwinked into buying something. We should know the site we’re reading gets paid if we buy. Skimlinks may want to be careful of how to think of this and respond to it; most people I know have a very hot button for being deceived by an advertiser, and most consider non disclosure of a paid link to a product purchase opportunity as deceptive.

Aaron
April 27, 2012

@R Davis, we completely agree with you, and this is why we always advocate disclosure. Even if it’s not required, it’s always better to be fully open and honest with your users.

Our CEO Alicia Navarro recently wrote another contributed article on this issue, explaining that the number one step in using tools to monetize is to disclose. Check it out: http://gigaom.com/2012/04/07/monetize-your-social-site-without-annoying-your-users/

Best,
Aaron (www.skimlinks.com/team#aaron)

[...] asked about Pinterest’s recent disclosure woes, Navarro gave very similar answers to those in her Skimlinks blog post amidst the media frenzy. She was amused when she first heard the news while visiting the Pinterest [...]

[...] with a transactional component like these affiliate links — a strategy previously trialled by networks like Pinterest in the [...]

[...] when it quietly adjusted some users’ links to become affiliate-marketing links, and seemed to be collecting all the revenue for itself. It says it has ceased using affiliate links and declined to comment on whether it would offer [...]

[...] when it quietly adjusted some users’ links to become affiliate-marketing links, and seemed to be collecting all the revenue for itself. It says it has ceased using affiliate links and declined to comment on whether it would offer [...]

[...] when it quietly adjusted some users’ links to become affiliate-marketing links, and seemed to be collecting all the revenue for itself. It says it has ceased using affiliate links and declined to comment on whether it would offer [...]

[...] when it quietly adjusted some users’ links to become affiliate-marketing links, and seemed to be collecting all the revenue for itself. It says it has ceased using affiliate links and declined to comment on whether it would offer [...]

[...] it sensitively practiced some users’ links to turn affiliate-marketing links, and seemed to be collecting all a income for itself. It says it has ceased regulating associate links and declined to criticism on either it would [...]

[...] it sensitively practiced some users’ links to turn affiliate-marketing links, and seemed to be collecting all a income for itself. It says it has ceased regulating associate links and declined to criticism on either it would [...]

[...] it sensitively practiced some users’ links to turn affiliate-marketing links, and seemed to be collecting all a income for itself. It says it has ceased regulating associate links and declined to criticism on either it would [...]

[...] it sensitively practiced some users’ links to turn affiliate-marketing links, and seemed to be collecting all a income for itself. It says it has ceased regulating associate links and declined to criticism on either it would [...]

[...] it quietly adjusted some users’ links to become affiliate-marketing links, and seemed to be collecting all the revenue for itself. It says it has ceased using affiliate links and declined to comment on whether it would offer [...]

[...] also responded to the controversy stating “Pinterest’s use of Skimlinks technology is nothing new, nor is [...]

self defense
July 15, 2013

Hmm it looks like your blog ate my first comment (it was
extremely long) so I guess I’ll just sum it up what I had written and say, I’m
thoroughly enjoying your blog. I as well am an aspiring blog blogger but I’m still new to everything. Do you have any suggestions for rookie blog writers? I’d really appreciate it.

[...] revenue is from affiliate marketing, and Pinterest has dabbled in this area in the past with its partnership with social discovery site Skimlinks. Users seem to approve of affiliate marketing rather than being bombarded by covert ads all the [...]

Andre
June 1, 2014

Hmm is anyone else having problems with the images on this blog loading?
I’m trying to find out if its a problem on my end
or if it’s the blog. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

SkimAlice
June 2, 2014

Hi Andre! Alice from Skimlinks here. There is indeed an issue with some of the images on our blog at the moment. We’re working on fixing it though so they should all be up and running soon!

Rosemarie
June 15, 2014

Wow, this article is good, my sister is analyzing these things, therefore I am going to
inform her.

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